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Jaguar Classic C-type 70-Edition revealed

70 years after its Le Mans success, the C-type returns to Jaguar showrooms

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auto, car, cars, jaguar, jaguar classic c-type 70-edition revealed
auto, car, cars, jaguar, jaguar classic c-type 70-edition revealed
auto, car, cars, jaguar, jaguar classic c-type 70-edition revealed
auto, car, cars, jaguar, jaguar classic c-type 70-edition revealed
auto, car, cars, jaguar, jaguar classic c-type 70-edition revealed

JAGUAR CLASSIC has this month revealed two exclusive C-type continuations to celebrate the model’s achievements at the 1953 24 Hours of Le Mans.

With “distinctive specifications”, the duo will be manufactured at Jaguar’s state-of-the-art Classic Works facility in Coventry.

Jaguar says each C-type Continuation 70-Edition has been exclusively tailored in an evocative colour and trim with hand-crafted silver enamelled badging, 70-Edition stitching and embroidery and painted roundels with racing number 70.

The first of the pair is finished in a one-off colour of Verbier Silver with Cranberry Red leather interior. This never-to-be-repeated combination is inspired by the C-type’s Platinum Anniversary.

The second example is a tribute to the victorious 1953 race car of Rolt and Hamilton, C-type XKC051. It is finished in the Works Team colours of British Racing Green with a Suede Green leather.

The winning driver pair of Tony Rolt and Duncan Hamilton covered over 2500 miles (4023km) at an average speed of 105.85mph (170.35km/h) breaking the previous record and in the process became the first winners to take the title with an average speed of over 100mph (160.98km/h).

The 70-Edition logo is inspired by the visual features of the C-type, originally created by Jaguar designer Malcolm Sawyer, famously responsible for crafting the D- and E-type.

Each 70-Edition comes with a bespoke key housing and dashboard plaque from partner Deakin & Francis. Founded in 1786, Deakin & Francis is one of England’s oldest manufacturing jewellers and have crafted the dashboard plaque from a 1953 C-type fuel tank.

“Each C-type Continuation is a rare and special vehicle to grace any collection, but we are delighted to reveal these two exquisite editions to commemorate a landmark year for Jaguar and motorsport,” said Jaguar Land Rover Classic senior manager for strategy and business development, Matthew Bailey.

“In 1953, the introduction of the disc brake combined with C-type’s clever design and engineering, meant that the vehicle was dominant at the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

“The C-type is a historically significant car with Jaguar pioneering disc-brake technology 70 years ago and we often take for granted the fact that the disc brake remains the industry standard.”

Each handcrafted C-type Continuation takes over 3000 hours to complete. The all-aluminium model is powered by a 164kW 3.4-litre inline six-cylinder engine (which itself took over nine months to construct) with meticulously-finished triple Weber 40DCO3 carburettors.

Jaguar Classic said the attention to detail shown in the model combines the extensive research, engineering knowledge and modern tools available from Jaguar Land Rover including advanced CAD modelling as well as the same in-period build methods and techniques familiar to the 1950s era.

The first examples of the C-type Continuation are now being completed and delivered to customers across the globe. All are FIA-approved and eligible to participate in assorted FIA Historic events, including the Jaguar Classic Challenge.

The limited run of C-type Continuations is available now. To configure your C-type using Jaguar Classic’s 3D visualiser click here.

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